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abc | English Small Letter | English Small Alphabet Learning | How to Write on Magnetic Board

Sat 3 December 2016 - ASHA T&S BD TV

Smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages. The writing systems that distinguish between the upper and lower case have two parallel sets of letters, with each letter in one set usually having an equivalent in the other set. The two case variants are alternative representations of the same letter: they have the same name and pronunciation and will be treated identically when sorting in alphabetical order. Letter case is generally applied in a mixed-case fashion, with both upper- and lower-case letters appearing in a given piece of text. The choice of case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline. Lower case a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z The glyphs of lower-case letters can resemble smaller forms of the upper-case glyphs restricted to the base band (e.g. "C/c" and "S/s", cf. small caps) or can look hardly related (e.g. "D/d" and "G/g"). Here is a comparison of the upper and lower case variants of each letter included in the English alphabet. Case styles In English, a variety of case styles are used in various circumstances: Sentence case "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" A mixed-case style in which the first word of the sentence is capitalised, as well as proper nouns and other words as required by a more specific rule. This is generally equivalent to the baseline universal standard of formal English orthography. Title case (capital case, headline style) "The Quick Brown Fox Jumps over the Lazy Dog" A mixed-case style with all words capitalised, except for certain subsets (particularly articles and short prepositions and conjunctions) defined by rules that are not universally standardised. The standardisation is only at the level of house styles and individual style manuals. (See further explanation below at § Headings and publication titles.) In text processing, title case usually involves the capitalisation of all words irrespective of their part of speech. This simplified variant of title case is also known as start case or initial caps. All lowercase "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" A unicase style with no capital letters. This is sometimes used for artistic effect, such as in poetry. Also commonly seen in computer commands, and in SMS language (avoiding the shift key, to type more quickly). Source of Information : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_case

Sat 3 December 2016 - ASHA T&S BD TV

Smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages. The writing systems that distinguish between the upper and lower case have two parallel sets of letters, with each letter in one set usually having an equivalent in the other set. The two case variants are alternative representations of the same letter: they have the same name and pronunciation and will be treated identically when sorting in alphabetical order. Letter case is generally applied in a mixed-case fashion, with both upper- and lower-case letters appearing in a given piece of text. The choice of case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline. Lower case a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z The glyphs of lower-case letters can resemble smaller forms of the upper-case glyphs restricted to the base band (e.g. "C/c" and "S/s", cf. small caps) or can look hardly related (e.g. "D/d" and "G/g"). Here is a comparison of the upper and lower case variants of each letter included in the English alphabet. Case styles In English, a variety of case styles are used in various circumstances: Sentence case "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" A mixed-case style in which the first word of the sentence is capitalised, as well as proper nouns and other words as required by a more specific rule. This is generally equivalent to the baseline universal standard of formal English orthography. Title case (capital case, headline style) "The Quick Brown Fox Jumps over the Lazy Dog" A mixed-case style with all words capitalised, except for certain subsets (particularly articles and short prepositions and conjunctions) defined by rules that are not universally standardised. The standardisation is only at the level of house styles and individual style manuals. (See further explanation below at § Headings and publication titles.) In text processing, title case usually involves the capitalisation of all words irrespective of their part of speech. This simplified variant of title case is also known as start case or initial caps. All lowercase "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" A unicase style with no capital letters. This is sometimes used for artistic effect, such as in poetry. Also commonly seen in computer commands, and in SMS language (avoiding the shift key, to type more quickly). Source of Information : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_case
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