149th St.-GRAND CONCOURSE VIEWS ( 8-06-01)

Tue 7 August 2012 - Transitviews

In this very rare view taken from the pedestrian overpass on August 6, 2001, we see 149th St-Grand Concourse (Mott Ave.) during a transitional period when new R142's were arriving and replacing the Redbirds on the 2 Seventh Ave line. At this time, the 2 line still operated Redbirds alongside with the new R142's that would soon replace them. The number 5 Dyre Ave line was still exclusively Redbird territory. All this would change within the next two years as new R142's from Bombardier and R142A's from Kawasaki would be added to the fleet, allowing the retirement of the aging Redbird equipment on the ramaining lines. We see new R142's of the 6300 and 6400 series as they enter and leave the station. Next, we see a number 5 Dyre Ave. train with a mixed consist of R26, 28 and 29 series of Redbirds with R26, 7783 on the lead. The 5 trains are sent down Lexington Ave when they leave 149th St through 1-A Loop track which connects with the number 4 Lexington Ave line on the upper level, that criss-crosses over the 2 and 5 lines on the lower level. The 5 train will make one final stop at 138th St-Grand Concourse, Bronx before heading into Manhattan. On it's return trip northbound, number 5 trains will go through 4-A Loop track when they leave 138th St. and turn as they enter the station.Next a southbound 2 train of R33 Redbird equipment is seen entering the station with R33, 8982 on the lead. The 2 Seventh Ave trains head into Manhattan when they leave 149th St. and they connect with the 3 Lenox Ave line before they reach 135th St. THE STATION: Originally built by the Interborough Rapid Transit System (IRT) in 1905, it was the first subway station built in the Bronx. It was then called Mott Ave. The lower level featured a high arched ceiling, similar to the 168 and 181 St. stations on the number 1 Broadway line. A new tower built in the mid 70's replacing the original tower at the south end of the southbound platform, covers over the ceiling in the middle of the station. However, part of the original arched ceiling can still be seen at the south end of the station. The station also has an upper level of three tracks where the 4 Woodlawn-Jerome Ave lines runs. The 4 line runs down Lexington Ave in Manhattan. The Woodlawn-Jerome Ave. platform criss crosses over the station on the lower level. 149th St. Grand Concourse also had an elevator that connected to the now closed overpass and to the upper level.The station was also popular in the '70s and '80 as a meeting place for graffiti aritists, who would meet at the south end of the northbound platform at a bench dubbed the "writer's bench" to watch the trains pass with their "tags" on them. Today, there are pillars between the northbound and southbound tracks, installed during a major signal project in 2002, on the White Plains line. It now blocks the unobstructed view that was once available. The pneumatic switch machines once heard as they routed the 2 and 5 trains are now silent, replaced by electric machines during the signal project. The station is also slated for a long overdue rehab within the next year.

Tue 7 August 2012 - Transitviews

In this very rare view taken from the pedestrian overpass on August 6, 2001, we see 149th St-Grand Concourse (Mott Ave.) during a transitional period when new R142's were arriving and replacing the Redbirds on the 2 Seventh Ave line. At this time, the 2 line still operated Redbirds alongside with the new R142's that would soon replace them. The number 5 Dyre Ave line was still exclusively Redbird territory. All this would change within the next two years as new R142's from Bombardier and R142A's from Kawasaki would be added to the fleet, allowing the retirement of the aging Redbird equipment on the ramaining lines. We see new R142's of the 6300 and 6400 series as they enter and leave the station. Next, we see a number 5 Dyre Ave. train with a mixed consist of R26, 28 and 29 series of Redbirds with R26, 7783 on the lead. The 5 trains are sent down Lexington Ave when they leave 149th St through 1-A Loop track which connects with the number 4 Lexington Ave line on the upper level, that criss-crosses over the 2 and 5 lines on the lower level. The 5 train will make one final stop at 138th St-Grand Concourse, Bronx before heading into Manhattan. On it's return trip northbound, number 5 trains will go through 4-A Loop track when they leave 138th St. and turn as they enter the station.Next a southbound 2 train of R33 Redbird equipment is seen entering the station with R33, 8982 on the lead. The 2 Seventh Ave trains head into Manhattan when they leave 149th St. and they connect with the 3 Lenox Ave line before they reach 135th St. THE STATION: Originally built by the Interborough Rapid Transit System (IRT) in 1905, it was the first subway station built in the Bronx. It was then called Mott Ave. The lower level featured a high arched ceiling, similar to the 168 and 181 St. stations on the number 1 Broadway line. A new tower built in the mid 70's replacing the original tower at the south end of the southbound platform, covers over the ceiling in the middle of the station. However, part of the original arched ceiling can still be seen at the south end of the station. The station also has an upper level of three tracks where the 4 Woodlawn-Jerome Ave lines runs. The 4 line runs down Lexington Ave in Manhattan. The Woodlawn-Jerome Ave. platform criss crosses over the station on the lower level. 149th St. Grand Concourse also had an elevator that connected to the now closed overpass and to the upper level.The station was also popular in the '70s and '80 as a meeting place for graffiti aritists, who would meet at the south end of the northbound platform at a bench dubbed the "writer's bench" to watch the trains pass with their "tags" on them. Today, there are pillars between the northbound and southbound tracks, installed during a major signal project in 2002, on the White Plains line. It now blocks the unobstructed view that was once available. The pneumatic switch machines once heard as they routed the 2 and 5 trains are now silent, replaced by electric machines during the signal project. The station is also slated for a long overdue rehab within the next year.
Doraemon
My Cartoon Video

Doraemon

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Peppa Pig
My Cartoon Video

Peppa Pig

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Songs
My Cartoon Video

Songs

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Regal Academy
My Cartoon Video

Regal Academy

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Funny videos
My Cartoon Video

Funny videos

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Dora
My Cartoon Video

Dora

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Duggee
My Cartoon Video

Duggee

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons

Super Wings
My Cartoon Video

Super Wings

Watch the videos of your favorite Cartoons